Quality and safety

Quality and safety

Quality and safety

Quality and safety

An effective safety culture is crucial to the success of safety activities. SAS works systematically to improve the safety culture at all levels of the organization.

SAS aims for a leading position in the airline industry with a highly developed safety culture. This should be perceived as a natural ambition for SAS customers and employees. A cornerstone of efforts to improve the safety culture is always learning from positive and negative experiences, so that individuals and the organization can develop and contribute to continuously reducing SAS operational risk exposure. Regularly conducted surveys show that the safety culture at SAS is of a high standard.

Development of safety activities in 2014

SAS’s safety work has top priority and is part of the company’s DNA. The safety culture at SAS rests on the values, skills and experience of all employees throughout the organization. The safety culture includes actively learning, adapting and modifying individual and organizational behavior to constantly improve operations and reduce exposure to risk. The efforts are managed with the aim of achieving continuous improvements and a shared understanding of the importance of safety to the customers and to SAS. The management of SAS is constantly engaged in safety issues based on a safety policy that is documented, communicated and implemented in SAS operations. In spring 2014, practical application of safety policy came in the form of an information campaign highlighting ten key safety behaviors required from all employees. In 2014, new regulatory requirements were introduced for flight safety, these included a more detailed safety management system (SMS). As part of meeting these new guidelines, a new safety reporting system compatible with the pilots’ iPads was implemented in autumn 2014. SAS has also continued efforts to identify and manage safety issues in its assessment of safety performance indicators, whereby data is gathered from flight operations, crews, station activities, technical maintenance and aviation security and compiled in a hierarchical system of objective safety performance indicators. This system illustrates how the daily operations are progressing in relation to the safety targets identified by SAS.

SAS is actively engaged in the development of fatigue risk management. SAS is already a partner in the Airline Fatigue Reduction (ALFRED) research project, in collaboration with government agencies, the industry and universities, to enhance the scientific model behind the measurement of fatigue and assessment of flight crews. The first version of this model was tested at the end of 2013 and an updated version for scheduling was tested in 2014. Over the year, SAS has also contracted services for performing flight data analysis. Flight Data Management is a system that provides increased ability for identifying trends and deviations in daily flight operations.

In 2014, SAS underwent IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA) certification which is comparable with ISO 9000 certification. This was the sixth time in twelve years that SAS has completed this flight-safety audit. All six audits were completed with no deviations identified. Maintaining the certification requires approval by the IATA every second year after the original audit. SAS only initiates code-share collaboration with other airlines that have IOSA certification or that have submitted to a comparable audit.

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